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Scientists on verge of decoding a 5,000 year old language


One of the last remaining un-deciphered languages of the ancient world, proto-elamite is a writing system that was used in what is now the south west of Iran about 3,200 - 2,900 BC.


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With the use of hi-tech equipment scientists from the University of Oxford are closing in on deciphering the language. As interesting as this is in and of itself, the real value of the article is the reason this ancient writing system became extinct. Of course, the glimpse afforded into the lives of the ancients is fascinating too.

Read the full article on the BBC here.



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Ivan Vandermerwe is the CEO of SAECULII YK, owner of Japan based Translation Service in Tokyo Visit SAECULII for the latest professional articles and news on Japanese Translation Service

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2 &DISCUSS response(s) so far ↓

  • 1 » Akiko Akiya (2012-10-25)

    So mysterious! It's like "Indiana Jones"!
  • 2 » Shoko (2012-10-27)

    I'd be interested to read more once he completes his work to find more about this ancient language. It's very interesting.

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